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AIH Chapter 3

Updated: Apr 12, 2022

CHAPTER TITLE: The Learning Process


Below is a list of the figures (diagrams, charts, and pictures) from the AIH Chapter 3. They are listed in the order they are found in the Aviation Instructor's Handbook.


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FIGURE 3-1

An effective instructor understands the characteristics of learning and assists accordingly.


FIGURE 3-2

Learning theories of psychology include classical conditioning, operant conditioning, and social learning.


FIGURE 3-3

Psychologists and educators who established the theories of cognitive learning.


FIGURE 3-4

Bloom’s Taxonomy of the Cognitive Domain.


FIGURE 3-5

Most learning occurs through sight, but the combination of sight and hearing accounts for about 88 percent of all perception.


FIGURE 3-6

A learner acquires knowledge through memorization, understanding, and application.


FIGURE 3-7

E. L. Thorndike (1874–1949).


FIGURE 3-8

An overview of the three learning domains.


FIGURE 3-9

The six major levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy of the Cognitive Domain with types of behavior with objectives.


FIGURE 3-10

Learning is progressive and occurs at several basic levels.


FIGURE 3-11

The affective domain (attitudes, beliefs, and values) contains five educational objective levels.


FIGURE 3-12

The psychomotor domain (physical skills) consists of seven educational objective levels.


FIGURE 3-13

A listing such as the one shown here is useful for development of almost any training program.


FIGURE 3-14

The importance of recognizing a dominant brain hemisphere gives the instructor a guide for ways to teach and reinforce learning.


FIGURE 3-15

Some of the different traits utilized by each learning style.


FIGURE 3-16

Visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learning styles (VAK).


FIGURE 3-17

Learners will probably experience a learning plateau at some point in their training.


FIGURE 3-18

A learner exhibits deliberate practice by plotting courses for his next training flight.


FIGURE 3-19

Pilot practices cross-wind landings repeatedly to improve performance.


FIGURE 3-20

A pilot is required to perform several tasks at once during approaches and landings.


FIGURE 3-21

Other mistakes arise under pressure. For example, a technician or pilot might perform a cursory inspection of an aircraft to save time, only to have a problem manifest itself later.


FIGURE 3-22

Information processing within the sensory register, working on short-term memory, and long-term memory includes complex coding, sorting, storing, and recall functions.


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