CLASS B AIRSPACE RULES

Updated: Jan 22

Understanding Class B Airspace Rules can be confusing for pilots and breaking one of these rules could result in FAA action.


Here's what you need to know.

WHERE IS CLASS B AIRSPACE?

Class B Airspace surrounds large (most often international) airports. Because these airports have heavy traffic operations it is important that pilots understand the airspace rules listed below.


CLASS B AIRSPACE DIMENSIONS

Each Class B Airspace has its own customized dimensions. However, they are generally shaped like an upside down wedding cake with different altitude shelves. You can see these shelves and the areas Class B covers in the example picture below.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Pilots must receive explicit clearance from the appropriate ATC facility prior to entering Class B Airspace. After your request to enter the airspace, your clearance will sound something like: "N736TB cleared to enter Salt Lake Class B Airspace." If you do not hear the words "cleared to enter Class B Airspace" you are not cleared to enter!


In addition to receiving a radio clearance, the plane must also be fitted with an operating Mode C Transponder. The pilot must also have at least a Private Pilot License.


Certain Class B Airports allow for student pilot operations as long as the student pilot has the proper endorsement from their flight instructor. However, this rule does not apply to all Class B Airspaces.


VFR WEATHER MINIMUMS

In order to operate VFR in Class B Airspace, pilots must have at least 3 Statute Miles of Flight Visibility and be able to remain clear of all clouds in the area.


Author - Nate Hodell

CFI/CFII/MEI/ATP - Creator of wifiCFI - Owner of Axiom Aviation Flight School.


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