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PHAK Chapter 2

Updated: Apr 12, 2022

CHAPTER TITLE: Aeronautical Decision Making


Below is a list of the figures (diagrams, charts, and pictures) from the PHAK Chapter 2. They are listed in the order they are found in the Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge.


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FIGURE 2-1

The percentage of aviation accidents as they relate to the different phases of flight. Note that the greatest percentage of accidents take place during a minor percentage of the total flight.


FIGURE 2-2

Advisory Circular (AC) 60-22, “Aeronautical Decision Making,” carries a wealth of information for the pilot to learn.


FIGURE 2-3

Risk management decision-making process.


FIGURE 2-4

The five hazardous attitudes identified through past and contemporary study.


FIGURE 2-5

This risk matrix can be used for almost any operation by assigning likelihood and consequence. In the case presented, the pilot assigned a likelihood of occasional and the severity as catastrophic. As one can see, this falls in the high risk area.


FIGURE 2-6

Example of a more comprehensive risk assessment program.


FIGURE 2-7

The PAVE checklist.


FIGURE 2-8

Human factors effects pilots, aviation maintenance technicians (AMTs) and air traffic control (ATC).


FIGURE 2-9

The Five Ps checklist.


FIGURE 2-10

Risk management processing can take place in any of three timeframes.


FIGURE 2-11

A real-world example of how the 3P model guides decisions on a cross-country trip using the PAVE checklist.


FIGURE 2-12

A real-world examples of how the 3P model guides decisions on a cross-country trip using the CARE checklist.


FIGURE 2-13

A real-world example of how the 3P model guides decisions on a cross-country trip using the TEAM checklist.


FIGURE 2-14

The DECIDE model has been recognized worldwide. Its application is illustrated in column A while automatic/naturalistic decision-making is shown in column B.


FIGURE 2-15

Typical operational pitfalls requiring pilot awareness.


FIGURE 2-16

System stressors. Environmental, physiological, and psychological stress are factors that affect decision-making skills. These stressors have a profound impact especially during periods of high workload.


FIGURE 2-17

When possible, have a passenger reconfirm that critical tasks are completed.


FIGURE 2-18

Controllers work to make flights as safe as possible.


FIGURE 2-19

Balancing workloads can be a difficult task.


FIGURE 2-20

The pilot has a certain capacity of doing work and handling tasks. However, there is a point where the tasking exceeds the pilot’s capability. When this happens, tasks are either not performed properly or some are not performed at all.


FIGURE 2-21

Electronic flight instrumentation comes in many systems and provides a myriad of information to the pilot.


FIGURE 2-22

Two similar flight decks equipped with the same information two different ways, analog and digital. What are they indicating? Chances are that the analog pilot will review the top display before the bottom display. Conversely, the digitally trained pilot will review the instrument panel on the bottom first.


FIGURE 2-23

An example of an autopilot system.


FIGURE 2-24

Examples of different platforms. Top to bottom are the Beechcraft Baron G58, Cirrus SR22, and Cirrus Entega.


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