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PHAK Chapter 6

Updated: Apr 12, 2022

CHAPTER TITLE: Flight Controls


Below is a list of the figures (diagrams, charts, and pictures) from the PHAK Chapter 6. They are listed in the order they are found in the Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge.


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FIGURE 6-1

Mechanical flight control system.


FIGURE 6-2

Hydromechanical flight control system.


FIGURE 6-3

Helicopter flight control system.


FIGURE 6-4

Airplane controls, movement, axes of rotation, and type of stability.


FIGURE 6-5

Adverse yaw is caused by higher drag on the outside wing that is producing more lift.


FIGURE 6-6

Differential ailerons.


FIGURE 6-7

Frise-type ailerons.


FIGURE 6-8

Coupled ailerons and rudder.


FIGURE 6-9

Flaperons on a Skystar Kitfox MK 7.


FIGURE 6-10

The elevator is the primary control for changing the pitch attitude of an aircraft.


FIGURE 6-11

Aircraft with a T-tail design at a high AOA and an aft CG.


FIGURE 6-12

When the aerodynamic efficiency of the horizontal tail surface is inadequate due to an aft CG condition, an elevator down spring may be used to supply a mechanical load to lower the nose.


FIGURE 6-13

The stabilator is a one-piece horizontal tail surface that pivots up and down about a central hinge point.


FIGURE 6-14

The Piaggio P180 includes a variable-sweep canard design that provides longitudinal stability about the lateral axis.


FIGURE 6-15

The effect of left rudder pressure.


FIGURE 6-16

Beechcraft Bonanza V35.


FIGURE 6-17

Five common types of flaps.


FIGURE 6-18

Leading edge high lift devices.


FIGURE 6-19

Spoilers reduce lift and increase drag during descent and landing.


FIGURE 6-20

The movement of the elevator is opposite to the direction of movement of the elevator trim tab.


FIGURE 6-21

An antiservo tab attempts to streamline the control surface and is used to make the stabilator less sensitive by opposing the force exerted by the pilot.


FIGURE 6-22

A ground adjustable tab is used on the rudder of many small airplanes to correct for a tendency to fly with the fuselage slightly misaligned with the relative wind.


FIGURE 6-23

Some aircraft, including most jet transports, use an adjustable stabilizer to provide the required pitch trim forces.


FIGURE 6-24

Basic autopilot system integrated into the flight control system.


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