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Phonetic Alphabet Trainer

Updated: Jan 31, 2022

Phonetic Alphabet Lesson by wifiCFI

Lesson Contents


This trainer will cover the phonetic alphabet pronunciations for each letter and number used in aviation along with their Morse Code Identifiers. 

ALPHABET

A = Alpha - Morse Code: .-

B = Bravo - Morse Code: -...

C = Charlie - Morse Code: -.-.

D = Delta - Morse Code: -..

E = Echo - Morse Code: .

F = Foxtrot - Morse Code: ..-.

G = Golf - Morse Code: --.

H = Hotel - Morse Code: ....

I = India - Morse Code: ..

J = Juliet - Morse Code: .---

K = Kilo - Morse Code: -.-

L = Lima - Morse Code: .-..

M = Mike - Morse Code: --

N = November - Morse Code: -.

O = Oscar - Morse Code: ---

P = Papa - Morse Code: .--.

Q = Quebec - Morse Code: --.-

R = Romeo - Morse Code: .-.

S = Sierra - Morse Code: ...

T = Tango - Morse Code: -

U = Uniform - Morse Code: ..-

V = Victor - Morse Code: ...-

W = Whiskey - Morse Code: .--

X = X-Ray - Morse Code: -..-

Y = Yankee - Morse Code: -.--

Z = Zulu - Morse Code: --..

NUMBERS

0 = Zero - Morse Code: -----

1 = One - Morse Code: .----

2 = Two - Morse Code: ..---

3 = Tree - Morse Code: ...--

4 = Four - Morse Code: ....-

5 = Fife - Morse Code: .....

6 = Six - Morse Code: -....

7 = Seven - Morse Code: --...

8 = Eight - Morse Code: ---..

9 = Niner - Morse Code: ----.

10 = One Zero

11 = One One

Etc.


Practical Application

Spelling out the Identifier for the Ogden VOR (OGD) would be: "Oscar, Golf, Delta." The Morse Code Identifier for the Ogden VOR (OGD) would be:


--- (O)

--. (G)

-.. (D)


When reporting altitudes to ATC, a pilot should individualize each number (except the zero's) in their pronunciation. Let's look at a couple examples.

  1. A pilot wishes to report an altitude of 6,500' to ATC.

    1. He/She would state: "Six Thousand, Fife Hundred"

    2. "Sixty Five Hundred" would be incorrect for combining the 6 and 5 into a single number 65.

  2. A pilot wishes to report an altitude of 12,000 to ATC.

    1. He/She would state: "One Two Thousand"

    2. "Twelve Thousand" would be incorrect for combining the 1 and 2 into a single number of 12.

  3. A pilot wishes to report an altitude of 11,200 to ATC.

    1. He/She would state: "One One Thousand Two Hundred"

    2. "Eleven Thousand Two Hundred" would be incorrect for combining the 1 and 1 into a single number of 11.

That being said, will a pilot get in trouble for combining numbers together? Most likely not. Beginner and expert pilots alike often combine numbers together and technically pronounce them the wrong way. However, we want to teach the correct way to pronounce altitudes to ATC. Take this information and use it as you wish.


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